The Color of Geography: Rural versus Urban Voting

Ron Berger — In his keynote address to the delegates at the 2004 Democratic Party convention, Barack Obama, an Illinois state senator and nominee to the U.S. Senate, gave a rousing speech that would catapult him to the forefront of the Democratic Party and eventually the presidency of the United States. Obama noted that “alongside our famous individualism, there’s another ingredient in the American saga, … Continue reading The Color of Geography: Rural versus Urban Voting

Who Benefits When China “Cheats”?

Charles Cottle — In the world of international trade, China cheats. Much was made of this claim in the 2012 election season and now again in 2016. China’s cheating, it is claimed, creates an uneven “playing field” on which the United States is the loser.  For those who have not followed these issues, China is said to cheat in three basic ways. First, it subsidizes … Continue reading Who Benefits When China “Cheats”?

The Populist and Progressive Traditions in American Politics

Ron Berger — In his book Our Divided Political Heart: The Battle for the American Idea in an Age of Discontent, historian and political commentator E. J. Dionne puts America’s current political divide in historical perspective. Its roots, he argues, go back to the era in which the United States was founded. When the founders devised the U.S. Constitution, they were concerned with establishing a … Continue reading The Populist and Progressive Traditions in American Politics

Manger scene of Jesus' in the stable

Thoughts on the Incarnation of Jesus

Charles Cottle — The Birth of Jesus On Christmas day, 2015, there appeared in the New York Times an essay entitled, “The Christmas Revolution” by Peter Wehner. In the essay Wehner presents a provocative set of observations about the incarnation of Jesus. It is Wehner’s view that Jesus’ birth was a revolutionary event, not only for those reasons that are well known, but also for … Continue reading Thoughts on the Incarnation of Jesus